Ostrich Feathers and the Hill Cousins

http://maientertainmentlaw.com/?search=womans-levitra by | Jan 10, 2019 | Christine Nicholls |

source site Ostrich Feathers and the Hill Cousins The Prince of Wales’ Coat of Arms consists of three white ostrich feathers encircled by a gold coronet.  In the 18th century ostriches were heavily hunted for their feathers, used as adornments for hats, scarves and stoles by fashionable people. By the 19th century, the farming of ostriches allowed farmers to pluck the feathers instead of having to kill the birds, and the trade peaked as the century closed. Two cousins, Harold and Clifford Hill, both born and brought up on ostrich farms in South Africa, went to East Africa in 1904 (Clifford) and 1905 (Harold) to exploit the fashion. They were grandsons of a British settler in South Africa (1820), where Harold was born in Salem in 1881 and Clifford in Grahamstown in 1876.  Both had served with distinction in the Boer War, when Harold, a member of Nesbitt’s Scouts, was Colonel Wavell’s ‘galloper.’ They bought leasehold land on the Kapiti plains and captured and reared twelve ostrich chicks at Limuru. In 1905 they bought eighty birds from a German syndicate and put them on a train at Voi to take them to Limuru.  Ten birds died, so the rest were taken out at Kiu and had to walk to Limuru. Eventually the Hills acquired 10,000 well-watered acres and carried on the ostrich feather business at Katelemba, Wami and Kilima Farms, fifteen miles from Kapiti station and four miles from the Machakos boma. Lady Thorp, Harold’s daughter-in-law, said, ‘I stood in great awe of Harold Hill, my father-in-law, not so much because of his reputation with gun and rifle, but rather for his complete...