Northrup Book Available

Northrup Book Available

Northrup – The Life of William Northrup McMillan  is now available to purchase online.    In the US it can be purchased for $15 at Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com  In Europe it is available for £9.50 on Amazon.co.uk Book details: Northrup is the story of a big-hearted American millionaire, William Northrup McMillan, who came to Kenya in 1904 on a shooting expedition. He fell in love with the country and bought a large estate and a mountain. Having explored and hunted in Sudan and Ethiopia, he decided his future lay in Kenya and he would help in “opening up a completely new colony.” He poured his large fortune and all his enthusiastic energies into his adopted country, developing his estates, backing new business ventures and providing assistance to the needy. During World War I, he became a British citizen and received a knighthood for his wartime services. Towering over his fellows and weighing in at over 300 pounds, Northrup stood out in a crowd. He was a generous man and his hunting ranch at Juja and his town house at Chiromo were known for lavish hospitality and helped set the fashion for safari tourism. He hosted former US President Theodore Roosevelt in 1909. Northrup later was elected to the Legislative Council. He worked with both Ewart Grogan and Lord Delamere and funded various African training schemes. This book contains completely new research on William Northrup McMillan and his wife Lucie, who have hitherto been shadowy characters in the history of colonial Kenya. Northrup’s death in 1925 robbed Kenya of one of its most colourful and influential pioneering settlers. He is buried on Ol Donyo Sabuk,...

Just Coincidence?

I have reason to believe the phenomenon I am about to describe is not peculiar to myself as several of my contemporaries have found it so. I wonder if it was also so in settler days and if any other geriatric Kenyaphiles have experienced it. Mine is an extreme example but a degree of the same thing is common. My family and I shipped our car from Mombasa to Karachi and drove back to the UK with our two children via the Kyhber Pass, Turkey, Greece and Northern France. On the longer cross channel ferry route from Normandy to Southampton all the children on board, ours included, had disappeared. My wife and I were waiting in a queue for the duty free shop which had just opened and talking to two young children who had made friends with our two. Deciding we wanted our binoculars off the front seat of our car which was in the car deck, we gave the keys to the two stranger’s children asking them if they would pop down to get them. “It is a green Peugeot. We were one of the last on so it is near the stern of the ship and you can’t miss it because we have a large EAK (East Africa Kenya) sticker on the boot.”  A quarter of an hour passed and the children returned without the binoculars. “The key doesn’t fit the door.” One could hardly be annoyed at their incompetence, but I was a little irritated as I walked off to fetch them myself. I descended to the car deck and found that two cars behind...