Should Afrikaans have been Taught in Plateau Schools?

Should Afrikaans have been Taught in Plateau Schools? A large number of Afrikaners on the Uasin Gishu plateau in 1910 approached the Governor to establish a school for their children.  The government did establish two small schools in early 1910 but insisted on the exclusive use within them of the English language, which so dismayed the Afrikaners that the schools were not a success.  The matter was resolved in 1912 when it was agreed that Afrikaans could be used in the schools to Standard Two but after that English was compulsory.  Yet the fight was not over and for the next 25 years Loubser, a prominent Afrikaner pastor, agitated for the exclusive use of Afrikaans in schools.  He said, “We must not go along with foreign customs, we must not set the price of honour as sacred language rights, we must not forget the name and the veracity and the great history of our nation.  Twenty years from now when most of our fathers and mothers will be dead, what will become of our children?  It is not enough to leave the land and capital to them.” Loubser opened his own Afrikaans-medium school at Broederstroom in August of 1911 and a second school at Sergoit.  He employed two teachers from South Africa, Pienaar and de Villiers.  The government refused to give these establishments financial support; Governor Belfield said: “I made it clear to them that as members of a community settled upon British territory they are not entitled to make differentiation between themselves and others residing under the same rule and that no assistance would be given unless it...