New review on The Red Pelican

New review on The Red Pelican

Jon Arensen’s book is not only a good read; it is engaging and provocative, telling the heart-warming story of a man who has dedicated his entire life to God. The man’s name is Dick Lyth. And his story reveals that he was truly blessed with a servant’s heart. His Christian kindness and sensitivity to others in need fashioned him into an “Oasis in the wilderness” for anyone with whom he came in contact. He fulfilled the style of ministry taught by Christ. The words recorded in the 25th chapter of St. Matthew’s Gospel, aptly describe the work of Dick Lyth: “Well done, good and faithful servant.” Reserve plenty of time to not only read, but ponder the words of this book. You won’t regret it. Once you begin to unlock the wonder of this book, you won’t want to put it down. – Linda Hirsch...
Alone in the Desert

Alone in the Desert

Our safari company tried out a new route from the southeastern end of Lake Turkana to Marsabit National Park through the Koroli Desert. We were halfway across the 30 mile sandy stretch of the Koroli Desert, and the driver had not seen another vehicle all morning and there was only one set of tire tracks in the sand. In the heat haze ahead he saw a typical mirage, which seemed to change from a small black stone into a black boulder. On approaching the object, it turned into an elderly American lady in a blue safari suit, sitting in the sand alone in the middle of the inhabited, scorching hot desert. She arose as our vehicle pulled up beside her and inquired most politely, without showing any sign of relief or pleasure, “Excuse me, but would you be going anywhere near Mar-say-bit.” Had we not decided to take that route, she probably wouldn’t have seen another vehicle for a week and faced a horrible death from thirst. Obviously this good lady had not the faintest idea of the danger of her situation. She was one of a group of six safari clients in a Volkswagen Combi that had stopped for a pee on their way to Marsabit Lodge. The car had accidentally driven off without her some three hours previously and nobody had missed her! We eventually got through to Nairobi from Marsabit, and told her tour company we’d picked up their guest in the desert. They sent an aeroplane up for her as there was still no sign of her VW Combi. Dick Hedges, Nairobi This appeared in...
J.H.Patterson, author of The Man-Eaters of Tsavo

J.H.Patterson, author of The Man-Eaters of Tsavo

Many of you will have heard of John Henry Patterson, the man who shot the man-eating lions threatening the workers on the Mombasa-Lake Victoria railway line. He was in charge of building the railway bridge across the Tsavo River when the lions went on their murderous spree, and he succeeded in eliminating them. The book that he wrote describing the episode was a bestseller in its time and is still readily available, more than a hundred years later. But what became of Patterson? Did he fade into obscurity? In reality, Patterson’s subsequent life was full of incident. He achieved notoriety following a marital scandal and, later, fame in Israel. He himself was not Jewish, but rather of northern Irish Protestant stock. His parentage is unknown, though it has been suggested that he was born in 1867, the illegitimate son of a landed Irish family. He joined the army and served in India and South Africa. Meanwhile, in 1895 he married an unusual woman, Frances Helena Gray, a headmistress who had been one of the first to gain a BA in Pure Science and a Doctorate of Law. He then left for Kenya to build bridges for the railway, leaving his wife in England. In 1907 he was appointed a game warden in Kenya, and it was while he was conducting a married couple on safari, Ethel and Audley Blyth, that disaster struck. Audley shot himself in his tent under suspicious circumstances. Patterson buried him on the spot and continued with the safari, accompanied by Ethel. It was said that they shared a tent. It was some time before they...