Buck Fever

Buck Fever

expiring drug patents viagra alternative by | Dec 12, 2012 | Jon Arensen |

how to buy brand propecia in canadian drugstore Hunting is the avocation of most little boys that grow up in East Africa and I was no exception. At the age of ten I was given a .22 rifle by my father and taught how to use it. I started by shooting at paper targets mounted on termite hills and then moved on to shooting birds for the pot. But my big goal was to shoot a bushbuck. These beautiful antelope were secretive and although I frequently saw their splayed footprints in the damp soil, I never got a shot at one. After several years of camping in tents overlooking Lake Victoria, my father built a primitive road into our area. Then with the road built it was decided to have a church conference.  Sukuma men walked in from the surrounding areas and temporary shelters were erected to house them.  The Dilworth family drove in from Butundwe so that Dick could help with the preaching.  Their son Norm came as well.  He was a couple of years older than me and was a real bush kid.  He had a khaki hat pinned up on one side and he was really good with his .22 rifle.  We hit it off right away, spending most of our time shooting birds in the forest.  The men attending the conference needed to be fed.  They had various starchy foods like ugali, corn, and cassava.  But they also needed meat.  The only antelope in the area were the shy reclusive bushbuck. These antelope were often called harness buck because they had white spots and stripes on their red coats.  The females had no...
Tammu or Jook

Tammu or Jook

http://stepbirmingham.com/?search=real-female-viagra-from-online-drugstore by | Nov 18, 2012 | Jon Arensen |

http://virgin-yachts.com/?search=cialis-online-without-prescription Translation of the Scriptures into another language is an intriguing exercise. The translator is challenged to find terms in the receptor language for such key Biblical concepts as Holy Spirit, cross, Satan, evil spirits, savior, prayer and God. If these key terms do not carry an accurate meaning, then the ultimate translation will not be of much use. The finding of key terms is even more challenging when the receptor culture and language are far removed from that of the Bible The Murle people of South Sudan are a pastoral people who live on the flood plains near the Ethiopian border. My wife Barb and I moved there in 1975 to begin the process of learning their language and translating the Scriptures. We eventually trained a translation team of Murle men and began looking for key terms. I soon discovered that the traditional religion of the Murle focused on the worship of the high God. They referred to this God as Tammu. This word had several other meanings such as rain and sky, but linguistic suffixes helped make it clear that Tammu referred to a God with anthropomorphized characteristics. There were a number of factors that made this term attractive. Tammu was the original creator of the world and of the Murle people. The term Tammu referred to the supreme God only – not to a lower pantheon of spirits. Murle people prayed directly to Tammu in time of need such as drought or famine. The people honored Tammu, but at the same time they feared Him in a respectful way. The term Tammu was their term for God....
Murle Conflict

Murle Conflict

buy cialis no prescription online by | Oct 22, 2012 | Jon Arensen |

levitra professional mail order For much of my working career I have been involved with the Murle people of South Sudan. I first met the Murle when Barb and I did a linguistic survey of the South Sudan in 1975. We were intrigued by these traditional people living on the floodplains and a year later we moved to Pibor to live among them. We built a simple house overlooking the river and spent the next eight years studying the Murle language and culture. We made many good friends among the Murle, but in 1984 we had to leave the area due to the oncoming civil war. We continued the translation of the Murle New Testament in Kenya and upon its completion we distributed 4000 copies to the Murle people. Although the Murle were experiencing the stress of the civil war the number of churches continued to grow until they exceeded sixty. In May of 2011 I was able to return to Pibor for a short visit. I discovered that although the civil war was over, there were now serious tensions between the Murle and the neighboring people called the Nuer. An attack took place at a village called Lekwongole. Well-armed Nuer warriors attacked and killed 200 Murle, many of them women and children. The Murle have a reputation as ferocious fighters and they quickly organized a revenge attack on the Nuer. In turn the Nuer attacked again and these tit-for-tat fights have been taking place frequently over the past two years. Both sides are well armed with AK47s and the deaths on both sides have numbered in the hundreds. In December of 2011...
Culture Stress

Culture Stress

see by | Sep 17, 2012 | Jon Arensen |

http://causeofjesusdeath.com/?search=cheap-viagra-super-active I grew up in East Africa speaking a local language and associating with a large variety of African people. Since attending college I have spent 40 years working in Africa in many different roles including teaching, translating and administration. For many years I directed courses for incoming expatriates – both missionaries and college students. I gave a number of lectures on culture stress (often referred to as culture shock) and how to deal with it. One would think that with this background I would be somewhat immune to culture stress myself. However, an experience in England reinforced the fact that adjusting to another culture is an ongoing struggle. A number of years ago my family and I spent two years at Oxford University where I was doing graduate work in social anthropology. We enjoyed our time there and I felt I had a good understanding of how society worked at Oxford. Several years later I returned to the University to submit my thesis, the final requirement for my PhD. After reading the thesis my tutor deemed that it was ready for examination and asked me to prepare it for submission. I immediately started the involved process of filling out various forms and getting the manuscript ready for binding. One of the forms asked how many words were in the final product. I stated that there were 130,000 words – taking pride in the amount of material I had written. Several days later I received word from the graduate committee that my thesis was too long and not approved for submission. The committee would meet again in a few days...
Africa Revisited

Africa Revisited

how to buy real levitra no prescription required by | Sep 3, 2012 | Jon Arensen |

click The wind blew off Lake Tanganyika causing the coconut palms to whisper in the gentle breeze. I was sitting on a hard wooden chair in the courtyard of an elderly man named Musa. As the sun slowly set over the lake in a fantasy of red, I watched Musa’s family as they went about their preparations for the evening. The teenage daughters returned from the nearby river with clay pots of water balanced on their heads. One of Musa’s wives caught a red hen and handed it over to my traveling companion Hilali who carefully faced Mecca and then slit its throat in the proscribed Muslim way. Small fires were started with a hot ember and water was heated for our baths. This water was then taken into a small grass shelter and I stood on granite stones and poured the hot water over my head with a large cup – feeling clean and refreshed from the long day of travel. We sat around a table in the courtyard and sipped hot tea as we watched the moon begin to rise. The little boys herded up the Muscovy ducks and guided them into their reed pen. The pigeons flew into their mud built dovecot, and after much cooing and jostling they settled down for the night. The chickens put themselves to bed in their hen house built on ground level. One little chick was afraid to enter the dark doorway until she was the only chicken remaining outside. Finally the mother hen in a pique of anger came running out of the chicken house and grabbed the chick by the neck...
Horace The Horned Viper

Horace The Horned Viper

follow by | Aug 16, 2012 | Jon Arensen |

watch In the early 70s my wife and I were teachers at the Rift Valley Academy – a school located in the highlands of Kenya. Our students came from all over East Africa so during one of the vacations periods we decided to visit some of the parents who were located in eastern Congo. Barb and I drove our old VW bug through Uganda, then ruled by the despot Idi Amin, stopping at various Game Parks on the way. Upon arriving in the Congo we drove to various mission stations where we stayed with the parents of our students. One of our final trips took us through the famous Ituri Forest. The road was a thin ribbon of red mud – permanently in the shade from the great canopy of trees. Occasionally we spotted short reddish people – pygmies who were the original inhabitants of the great jungle. Rounding a curve we met a group of pygmy hunters coming out of the jungle. They were armed with bows and arrows and one of them was carrying a loosely woven basket. They hailed us, holding up the bag so we could see its contents. I was curious so I stopped the car.  The hunters clustered around the vehicle and I looked into the basket. Inside was a large snake. It had a thick scaly body and was marked by chevrons of brilliant green, red and blue. On its V-shaped head were two long horns. I recognized it as a rhinoceros viper – a rare denizen of the jungle. It was famous for its long hinged fangs with which it could inject...